How to start and use a leaf blower?

Having a leaf blower in your home will certainly keep your surroundings clean from debris and leaves. Using a leaf blower can quickly transform outdoor areas into attractive, functional spaces for play and relaxation. You can enjoy using a blower when you discover their ease and efficiency. Even after many people buy a leaf blower it’s not necessary that they know how to start and use a leaf blower. There are different types of leaf blowers and different methods of using them. Here we are discussing a few ways to start and using leaf blowers.

good cfm for a leaf blower

Having a leaf blower in your home will certainly keep your surroundings clean from debris and leaves. Using a leaf blower can quickly transform outdoor areas into attractive, functional spaces for play and relaxation. You can enjoy using a blower when you discover their ease and efficiency. Even after many people buy a leaf blower it’s not necessary that they know how to start and use a leaf blower. There are different types of leaf blowers and different methods of using them. Here we are discussing a few ways to start and using leaf blowers.

How to start a leaf blower?

Corded electric Leaf blower

A corded electric leaf blower is the easiest type to start. Make sure you read the instruction manual to find out exactly how your model works, but it shouldn’t be more complicated than plugging it in and hitting the “on” switch. If you have problems starting a new tool, check that it is plugged into a power outlet and that the power is on. If you have read the manual and followed the instructions and it still doesn’t work, there might be some kind of problem that needs to be fixed.

Cordless electric blowers

Cordless leaf blowers are basically the same as corded versions to start. Read the manual, make sure the battery is plugged in and hit “start” – that’s all you need to do. If you have problems starting a battery-powered leaf blower, the obvious thing to check before taking it to a repair shop is that the battery is charged up and ready to go.

2 stroke leaf blower

2-stroke engines require fuel that is a mixture of gasoline and oil to run. Most units run on a solution that is one part oil to 50 parts gas, or a ratio of 1:50. This works out at 2½oz oil to a gallon of gas. However, you should check the manual to be sure this is the correct ratio for your model. Once you have made the gas and oil mixture, you can pour it slowly into your leaf blower. Some blowers have an “on” switch. Make sure it is in the correct position or the blower won’t start. Before you start the blower, if starting from cold, you need to put the choke into the starting position. The next step is to prime the engine. Press the primer bulb five or six times. Take the cord firmly in one hand and hold the blower securely in the other. Give the cord a good strong pull. You may need to do this four or five times to start the engine, and after each pull, you should feed the cord back in slowly rather than just letting it snap back into place. Once the engine starts, you need to let it run for between 10 and 30 seconds. If you have a machine with a manual choke, after the engine has been running for a while, you should put the choke into the “run” position.

4- Stroke leaf blower

4-cycle engines work similarly to a vehicle engine. Gas goes in the fuel tank and oil goes in the crankcase. They’re more fuel-efficient than a 2-cycle engine, so you get more mileage out of every tank of gas, and you don’t have to mess with mixing gas and oil.  A 4-cycle engine has the potential to produce more power than a 2-cycle engine but will require an increase in the engine’s size. If comfort is an important factor for you, consider buying a lighter-weight 2-cycle leaf blower. If you have a 4 cycle backpack leaf blower, the procedure is almost the same as with a 2-cycle machine. The big difference is that they take fuel that is pure gas rather than a gas-oil mix. Simply add the fuel to your machine and follow the rest of the steps for 2-cycle blowers.

Tips to use a leaf blower

When using any kind of power tool, safety should be your primary concern, and these machines are no different. Leaf blowers can kick up twigs, dirt and all kinds of other debris, and before you start using one, you need to take steps to protect yourself. Here are a few tips to use a leaf blower

  • If you’re using your leaf blower to blow out the garage, start with the leaf blower close to the ground. This will kick up a lot of dust, so slowly raise the blower to a height where dust no longer is an issue.
  • Always blow in one direction to avoid blowing debris into an area you’ve already cleared.
  • If you’re wanting to be more courteous to neighbours, most leaf blowers come with a nozzle attachment that will reduce the noise of the leaf blower.
  • Leaf blowers have a range of uses, not just for fall leaf removal. You can use the leaf blower to clear a light layer of snow on your driveway, clean dust and dirt off other equipment, clean out leaves from rain gutters, dry up pavement, or even remove clumped up grass from your yard.
  • Hold the leaf blower to the side of your body and keep the nozzle at an angle toward the ground. Try to make your movements smooth as you move the blower side to side to remove debris.

Conclusion

When using your leaf blower, being aware of your surroundings is very important. Never point it at people or pets, both of whom should be fifty feet or more away during the use of the leaf blower. It is not a good idea to use a leaf blower indoors, though using them to blow out your garage is handy, but only because it is a well-ventilated area. Use protective eyewear while using your leaf blower to keep debris from flying into the eyes. Always select the leaf blower that suits your requirements. Use the leaf blower according to rules and regulations in your area. Make sure that you are not causing trouble to your neighbour while using the blower. Enjoy working!